Jane Austen

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Jane Austen

Jane Austen

There are people, who the more you do for them, the less they will do for themselves.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
I do not want people to be agreeable, as it saves me that trouble of liking them.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
A large income is the best recipe for happiness I ever heard of.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
Why not seize the pleasure at once, how often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish preparations.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
There is nothing like staying at home for real comfort.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
Life seems but a quick succession of busy nothings.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
A woman, especially if she has the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy;-- it is disposition alone. Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough for others.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
It is indolence... Indolence and love of ease; a want of all laudable ambition, of taste for good company, or of inclination to take the trouble of being agreeable, which make men clergymen. A clergyman has nothing to do but be slovenly and selfish; read the newspaper, watch the weather, and quarrel with his wife. His curate does all the work and the business of his own life is to dine.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
Those who do not complain are never pitied.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
It may be possible to do without dancing entirely. Instances have been known of young people passing many, many months successively without being at any ball of any description, and no material injury accrue either to body or mind; but when a beginning is made -- when the felicities of rapid motion have once been, though slightly, felt -- it must be a very heavy set that does not ask for more.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
Although our productions have afforded more extensive and unaffected pleasure than those of any other literary corporation in the world, no species of composition has been so much decried. And what are you reading, Miss -- -? Oh! it is only a novel! replies the young lady; while she lays down her book with affected indifference, or momentary shame. It is only Cecilia, or Camilla, or Belinda ; or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humor, are conveyed to the world in the best chosen language.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
It is always incomprehensible to a man that a woman should ever refuse an offer of marriage.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
Human nature is so well disposed towards those who are in interesting situations, that a young person, who either marries or dies, is sure of being kindly spoken of.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors, and laugh at them in our turn?More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
To sit in the shade on a fine day, and look upon verdure is the most perfect refreshment.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
Surprises are foolish things. The pleasure is not enhanced and the inconvenience is often considerable.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
Nobody can tell what I suffer! But it is always so. Those who do not complain are never pitied.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
A woman, especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery.More Jane Austen [01/01/2000 12:01:00]

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