Salman Rushdie

Salman Rushdie

a British writer of Indian origin
Ahmed Salman Rushdie, the noted British novelist placed under a fatwa (death sentence) by Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini in 1989 for blasphemy in handling the character of the Prophet Mohammed in The Satanic Verses (1988), although born in Mumbai (Bombay, India) in 1947, moved with his family to Pakistan at the age of 17. He was educated at the Cathedral School, Bombay, and then at Rugby Boys' School, England, before attending King's College, Cambridge, from which he graduated with a B. A. in 1968. During his years of schooling in England, he experienced minor persecution and racist attacks. However, upon graduation he chose to remain in Britain, working as an actor and advertising copywriter before becoming a full-time writer, producing his first novel, Grimus, in 1975, in the tradition of James Joyce, Gunter Grass, and the South American "Magic Realists."Although he won a certain celebrity with his second novel, the Booker prize-winning Midnight's Children (1981), an historical novel set at the moment that India and Pakistan achieved independence from Great Britain, it was the controversial Satanic Verses that made his name a household word. Its banning in India and throughout the Muslim world led to widespread demonstrations during which copies of the novel (and effigies of the author) were burned. Rushdie was forced into hiding, moving from one safehouse to another with the assistance of the British authorities and police until 1998, when Iran officially lifted the fatwa. The individual pieces in East, West Stories (1994), including the critically-celebrated, multi-voiced "CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS AND QUEEN ISABELLA OF SPAIN CONSUMMATE THEIR RELATIONSHIP (Santa Fe, A. D. 1492)," first published in the prestigious New Yorker Magazine. Dating from the same period are his children's book, Haroun and the Sea of Stories (1990), his book of essays, Imaginary Homelands (1991), and the novel The Moor's Last Sigh (1995).Source: scholars.nus.edu.sg
In India, as elsewhere in our darkening world, religion is the poison in the blood. Where religion intervenes, mere innocence is no excuse. Yet we go on skating around this issue, speaking of religion in the fashionable language of 'respect.' What is there to respect in any of this, or in any of the crimes now being committed almost daily around the world in religion's dreaded name?More Salman Rushdie quotes [03/29/2018 05:03:36]
The moment you declare a set of ideas to be immune from criticism, satire, derision, or contempt, freedom of thought becomes impossible.More Salman Rushdie quotes [03/29/2018 05:03:36]
Not even the visionary or mystical experience ever lasts very long. It is for art to capture that experience, to offer it to, in the case of literature, its readers; to be, for a secular, materialist culture, some sort of replacement for what the love of god offers in the world of faith.More Salman Rushdie quotes [03/29/2018 05:03:36]
One of the extraordinary things about human events is that the unthinkable becomes thinkable.More Salman Rushdie quotes [03/29/2018 05:03:36]
I became a writer because I got addicted to story. The first storyteller in my life was my father.More Salman Rushdie quotes [03/29/2018 05:03:36]

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