Steven Spielberg

Steven Spielberg

Director of 'The Sugarland Express'

Background:

A living legend in the world of moviemaking, Steven Spielberg has astounded
audiences with numerous award-winning films. He has earned his fame for movies
such as the Holocaust-set Schindler’s List (1993, took home two Academy Awards
and a Golden Globe Award) and the World War II story Saving Private Ryan (1998,
won an Academy Award and a Golden Globe Award), the sci-fi E.T. the
Extra-Terrestrial (1982, brought home 4 Best Director awards, 4 Best Foreign
Film awards and 2 Oscar nominations) and Jurassic Park (1993, netted a Saturn
Award and a Czech Lions Award).

Working with animated films, Spielberg stood proud with “Tiny Toon Adventures”
(1990-1992, nabbed two Daytime Emmy Awards), “Freakazoid” (1995-1997, won a
third Daytime Emmy Award), “Pinky and the Brain” (1995-1998, netted another
Daytime Emmy Award) and the special program A Pinky & the Brain Christmas
Special (1995, took home an Emmy Award). During his long career, the blockbuster
creator has been garnered with various honor awards, including an Oscar’s Irving
G. Thalberg Memorial Award (1987) and a Directors Guild of America’s Lifetime
Achievement Award (2000).

Spielberg formed his own production company, Amblin Entertainment, in 1984. Ten
years later, with David Geffen and former Disney executive Jeffrey Katzenberg,
Spielberg founded the multimedia entertainment company DreamWorks SKG. Outside
the studio spotlight, Spielberg is a founding member and Vice President of the
Artists Rights Foundation. He also formed the Survivors of the Shoah Visual
History Foundation to gather Holocaust testimonials and invested in the CD-ROM
company Knowledge Adventure. Spielberg, who in 2003 received a star on the
Hollywood Walk of Fame, was named the 2005 Forbes’ “The Highest Earning
Celebrity in the World.”

With his charity organization, the Righteous Person Foundation, the moviemaker
will donate $1,000,000 for relief efforts in Israel to the Jewish Federation of
Los Angeles Israel Crisis Fund, the New Israel Fund and other relief
organizations in Israel. As a Democrat, Spielberg recently announced his support
for Arnold Schwarzenegger (Republican) for a re-election campaign.

On a more private note, Spielberg was once married to actress Amy Irving
(1985-1989, has a son). Now, he is married to Kate Capshaw, with whom he has two
daughters and a son. He is also the father of two adopted children and a
stepdaughter, actress Jessica Capshaw.


Escape to Nowhere

Childhood and Family:

Steven Allan Spielberg was born on December 18, 1946, in Cincinnati, Ohio, to
Arnold Spielberg and Leah Adler. He is the brother of screenwriter/producer Anne
Spielberg (born on December 25, 1949), Nancy Spielberg and Sue Spielberg. His
parents divorced and later remarried.

Steven, who had an ardent passion for movies, made his first film at age 12. A
year later, he won a prize for his 40-minute war movie, Escape to Nowhere, and
eventually had a local theater screening with his 140-minute production of
Firelight (1963). Graduating from Arcadia High School in Phoenix, Steven took an
English program at the California State University in Long Beach after
previously being rejected by traditional film schools.

On November 27, 1985, Steven married actress Amy Irving (born on September 10,
1953), with whom he has a son, Max Spielberg (born in June 1985). Four years
later, the couple divorced and Steven later married actress Kate Capshaw (born
on November 3, 1953), on October 12, 1991. From the marriage, he has two
daughters (Sasha Spielberg and Destry Allyn Spielberg) and a son (Sawyer
Spielberg). He is also the father of two adopted children (Theo Spielberg and
Mikaela George Spielberg) and a stepdaughter (actress Jessica Capshaw, born in
1976).


Schindler’s List

Career:

At age 22, Steven Spielberg had his professional debut with the 24-minute Amblin’
(1968), after previously making the unfinished Slipstream (1967). With the
budget of $15,000, Amblin’ was screened at the Atlanta Film Festival in 1969 and
brought in a 7-year deal with the Television division of Universal-MCA Studio.
He then began his TV work by directing the “Eyes” segment of the supernatural
thriller Night Gallery (1969, TV), as well as an episodic directing effort for
several series, including “Marcus Welby, M.D.” (1970) and “The Psychiatrist”
(1971).

Spielberg quickly caught attention with the suspense-filled TV film Duel (1971),
which won an Avoriaz Fantastic Film Festival’s Grand Prize. Next, in his horror
TV movie Something Evil (1972), the young director also appeared on screen,
playing a role. He also wrote the story of Ace Eli and Rodger of the Skies
(1973) before taking home a Cannes Film Festival for Best Screenplay for his
story in the crime drama The Sugarland Express (1974).

The director scored blockbuster success with the legendary thriller Jaws (1975,
also voiced an Amity Point Lifestation Worker, unaccredited), which was his
first collaboration with actor Richard Dreyfuss. Gaining even more success, his
next teamwork with Dreyfuss was in the blockbuster hit UFO movie Close
Encounters Of The Third Kind (1977, also worked on visual effects concepts),
which handed him a Saturn for Best Director and brought him an Oscar Best
Director nomination.

Yet, after executive producing the family comedy I Wanna Hold Your Hand (1978),
Spielberg failed to impress his audiences with the comedy 1941 (1979). He then
made a cameo appearance as the Cook County Assessor’s office clerk in The Blues
Brothers (1980), directed by John Landis.

His 1979 flop was eventually paid off with Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981),
co-written by George Lucas and Philip Kaufman, in which he collected such awards
as an American Movie Marquee, a Boston Society of Film Critics, a ShoWest and a
Saturn for Best Director. He also won a Kinema Junpo’s Readers’ Choice award for
Best Foreign Language Film and a second Oscar Best Director nomination.
Following the victory, Spielberg wrote and produced the horror thriller
Poltergeist (1982).

Spielberg’s fame soared even higher thanks to his impressive directing in E.T.
the Extra-Terrestrial (1982, also co-produced), which pulled in $399 million
during its initial release alone. Aside from the commercial success, the movie
harvested Best Director awards from the Boston Society of Film Critics, the Los
Angeles Film Critics Association and the National Society of Film Critics. Also,
Spielberg took home a PGA Golden Laurel Hall of Fame award, a David di Donatello
for Best Director in Foreign Film, as well as a Blue Ribbon, a Fotogramas de
Plata, and two Kinema Junpo awards for Best Foreign Film. In addition, E.T.
brought him two Oscar nominations (one for Best Director, one for Best Picture).
Later, to celebrate its 20th anniversary, E.T. was re-released with minor
changes and enhanced digital effects (2002).

Subsequent to Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983) and the sequel Indiana Jones and
the Temple of Doom (1984), Spielberg revived Alice Walker’s novel in The Color
Purple (1985), and netted a Directors Guild of America award and an Oscar Best
Picture nomination. Also in 1985, his self-produced sci-fi adventure movie Back
to the Future nabbed a David di Donatello for Best Producer. His first producing
task for an animated film in An American Tail (1986) was followed with his
victorious war drama Empire of the Sun (1987, won a National Board of Review for
Best Director). As the executive producer of the drama comedy Dad (1989),
Spielberg was given a Retirement Research Foundation Wise Owl award.

The next year, he developed the TV series about the new generation of Looney
Tunes characters, “Tiny Toon Adventures” (1990-1992) and became a two-time
winner of Daytime Emmy’s Outstanding Animated Program. In appreciation for his
previous accomplishments, Spielberg received numerous awards, including a Hasty
Pudding Theatricals Man of the Year (1983), a Giffoni Film Festival Nocciola
d’Oro (1984), an Oscar’s Irving G. Thalberg Memorial award (1987), an American
Cinematheque Gala Tribute’s American Cinematheque award (1989), an American
Cinema Editors’ Golden Eddie Filmmaker of the Year award (1990), a Venice Film
Festival’s Career Golden Lion (1993), a Young Artist’s Jackie Coogan award
(1994), an American Society of Cinematographers’ Board of the Governors award
(1994) and a ShoWest award for Director of the Year (1994).

Spielberg then helmed Hook (1991) and co-hosted (with his wife) the documentary
film Shattered Lullabies (1992), before making headlines with the
heart-wrenching Schindler’s List (1993), for which he swept up two Oscars, a
Golden Globe, two BAFTA awards, a Directors Guild of America award, a
Dallas-Forth Worth Film Critics Association award, a National Society of Film
Critics award, a Chicago Film Critics Association award, a PGA Golden Laurel, a
London Critics Circle Film award and an Amanda award (Norway) for his efforts.
He also forged the adventure dinosaur movie genre with Jurassic Park (1993),
which even out-preformed E.T. and garnered him a Saturn for Best Director and a
Czech Lions for Best Foreign Language Film.

The award-winning filmmaker was applauded for his involvement as an executive
producer in the animated series “Freakazoid” (1995-1997, won a Daytime Emmy),
“Pinky and the Brain” (1995-1998, netted a Daytime Emmy) and the cartoon special
program A Pinky & the Brain Christmas Special (1995, took home an Emmy). He also
proved his skill in directing in the sequel The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997,
received a Rembrandt’s Audience award) and the controversial legal drama Amistad
(1997, received a PGA Golden Laurel Vision award).

Once again, Spielberg became a phenomenon after directing the WWII drama Saving
Private Ryan (1998), which starred Tom Hanks, Edward Burns, Barry Pepper, Matt
Damon, and other Hollywood big names. Awards handed Spielberg for the film
included an Oscar, a Golden Globe and a Directors Guild of America award for
Best Director. Spielberg, who in 1995 was granted an American Film Institute
Life Achievement award and a César Honorary award, received another Daytime Emmy
for the spin-off animated series “Pinky, Elmyra & the Brain” (1998, executive
produced).

After helming the short documentary The Unfinished Journey (1999), Spielberg
stood proud with Artificial Intelligence: AI (2001, won a Saturn and a Venice
Film Festival award), his self-directed and written sci-fi movie based on the
story by late filmmaker Stanley Kubrick. He then resumed his association with
Tom Hanks, this time as a director, in the WWII-set miniseries “Band of
Brothers” (2001) and picked up an Emmy and a PGA Golden Laurel.

2002 saw the moviemaker direct Tom Cruise and Colin Farrell in the futuristic
thriller Minority Report (nabbed a Saturn and an Empire award), tell the story
of fraud Frank Abagnale Jr. in Catch Me If You Can (won a Broadcast Film Critics
Association award) and executive produce the hit Sci-Fi Channel miniseries
“Taken” (took home an Emmy). Two years later, Spielberg and Hanks carried on
their alliance with the comedy drama The Terminal (2004). It was followed by his
Oscar-nominated directing work in the historical drama Munich (2005, also earned
a Golden Globe and a Directors Guild of America nomination).

The executive producer recently released Monster House (2006) and is also known
as the creator of the epic video game franchise Medal of Honor (game was first
created in 1999). Adding to the list of his acknowledgments, Spielberg was
awarded a PGA Golden Laurel: Milestone award (1999), a Directors Guild of
America’s Lifetime Achievement award (2000), an Image Vanguard award (2000), a
National Board of Review’s Billy Wilder award (2001), a BAFTA/LA Britannia’s
Excellence in Film (2001), a Showest Convention Lifetime Achievement award
(2002) and a David di Donatello’s special award (2004) for his efforts.

Currently, the distinguished director has a number of screen projects underway.
He will produce such upcoming films as Letters from Iwo Jima (2006), Flags of
Our Fathers (2006), the miniseries “The Pacific War” (2006), an untitled
Ukrainian Holocaust project (2006), Disturbia (2007), Transformers (2007), the
reality show “On the Lot” (2007), the miniseries “Nine Lives” (2007), Lincoln
(2008, also directed), When Worlds Collide (2008), the sequel Jurassic Park IV
(2008), The Talisman (2008) and Interstellar (2009, also directed). Amid his
tasks in producing, Spielberg will also helm the sequel Indiana Jones 4 (2008).


Awards:

Broadcast Film Critics Association: Best Director, Catch Me If You Can,
2003
Emmy: Outstanding Miniseries, “Taken,” 2003
Empire: Best Director, Minority Report, 2003
Saturn: Best Direction, Minority Report, 2003
Emmy: Outstanding Miniseries, “Band Of Brothers,” 2002
Showest Convention: Lifetime Achievement Award, 2002
Saturn: Best Writing, Artificial Intelligence: AI, 2002
Venice Film Festival: Future Film Festival Digital Award, Artificial
Intelligence: AI, 2001
BAFTA/LA Britannia: Excellence in Film, 2001
National Board of Review: Billy Wilder Award, 2001
Daytime Emmy: Outstanding Children’s Animated Program, “Pinky, Elmyra &
the Brain,” 2000
Directors Guild of America: Lifetime Achievement Award, 2000
PGA Golden Laurel: PGA Hall of Fame - Motion Pictures, E.T. The
Extra-Terrestrial, 2000
Daytime Emmy: Outstanding Special Class - Animated Program, “Pinky and
the Brain,” 1999
PGA Golden Laurel: Motion Picture Producer of the Year Award, Saving
Private Ryan, 1999
Oscar: Best Director, Saving Private Ryan, 1999
Chicago Film Critics Association: Best Director, Saving Private Ryan,
1999
Directors Guild of America: Outstanding Directorial Achievement in
Motion Pictures, Saving Private Ryan, 1999
Empire: Best Director, Saving Private Ryan, 1999
Golden Globe: Best Director - Motion Picture, Saving Private Ryan, 1999
National Society of Film Critics: Best Director, Saving Private Ryan,
1999
PGA Golden Laurel: Milestone Award, 1999
Toronto Film Critics Association: Best Director, Saving Private Ryan,
1999
Las Vegas Film Critics Society: Sierra Award - Best Director, Saving
Private Ryan, 1998
Los Angeles Film Critics Association: Best Director, Saving Private
Ryan, 1998
Daytime Emmy: Outstanding Special Class - Animated Program, “Freakazoid,”
1997
Emmy: Outstanding Animated Program (for Programming One Hour or Less), A
Pinky & the Brain Christmas Special, 1996
American Film Institute: Life Achievement Award, 1995
César: Honorary Award, 1995
London Critics Circle Film: Director of the Year, Schindler’s List, 1995
Oscar: Best Picture, Schindler’s List, 1994
Oscar: Best Director, Schindler’s List, 1994
BAFTA: Best Film, Schindler’s List, 1994
BAFTA: David Lean Award for Direction, Schindler’s List, 1994
Chicago Film Critics Association: Best Director, Schindler’s List, 1994
American Society of Cinematographers: Board of the Governors Award, 1994
Directors Guild of America: Outstanding Directorial Achievement in
Motion Pictures, Schindler’s List, 1994
Golden Globe: Best Director - Motion Picture, Schindler’s List, 1994
National Society of Film Critics: Best Director, Schindler’s List, 1994
Saturn: Best Director, Jurassic Park, 1994
ShoWest Convention: ShoWest Award - Director of the Year, 1994
Boston Society of Film Critics: Best Director, Schindler’s List, 1993
Venice Film Festival: Career Golden Lion, 1993
Daytime Emmy: Outstanding Animated Program, “Tiny Toon Adventures,” 1993
Daytime Emmy: Outstanding Animated Program, “Tiny Toon Adventures,” 1991
American Cinema Editors: Golden Eddie Filmmaker of the Year Award, 1990
American Cinematheque Gala Tribute: American Cinematheque Award, 1989
Oscar: Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award, 1987
National Board of Review: Best Director, Empire Of The Sun, 1987
Directors Guild of America: Outstanding Directorial Achievement in
Motion Pictures, The Color Purple, 1986
Hasty Pudding Theatricals: Man of the Year, 1983
Boston Society of Film Critics Awards: Best Director, E.T. The
Extra-Terrestrial, 1983
Fotogramas de Plata: Best Foreign Film, E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial, 1983
National Society of Film Critics: Best Director, E.T. The
Extra-Terrestrial, 1983
Los Angeles Film Critics Association Awards: Best Director, E.T. The
Extra-Terrestrial, 1982
Saturn: Best Director, Raiders Of The Lost Ark, 1982
ShoWest Convention: ShoWest Award - Director of the Year, 1982
Saturn: Best Director, Close Encounters Of The Third Kind, 1978
Cannes Film Festival: Best Screenplay, The Sugarland Express, 1974


 
There's no better way to test a person than to put them in the middle of a war. That's clearly going to show what kind of a character you're telling a story about.More Steven Spielberg quotes [03/29/2018 05:03:36]
Money to me is not a factor in my life.More Steven Spielberg quotes [03/29/2018 05:03:36]
All those horrible, traumatic years I spent as a kid became what I draw from creatively today.More Steven Spielberg quotes [03/29/2018 05:03:36]
The internet is watching us now. If they want to. They can see what sites you visit. In the future, television will be watching us, and customizing itself to what it knows about us. The thrilling thing is, that will make us feel we're part of the medium. The scary thing is, we'll lose our right to privacy. An ad will appear in the air around us, talking directly to us.More Steven Spielberg quotes [03/29/2018 05:03:36]
Lincoln's leadership is based on a number of precepts, but my favorite one is that he acted in the name, and for the good, of the people.More Steven Spielberg quotes [03/29/2018 05:03:36]

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