computers

« Page 1 from 17, showing 1 - 60 from 1006 »

computers

The difference between e-mail and regular mail is that computers handle e-mail, and computers never decide to come to work one day and shoot all the other computers.More [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
The real danger is not that computers will begin to think like men, but that men will begin to think like computers.More [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
Even though these technological advances originally sought to control information and bring order to the office, in many instances they have done just the opposite. The electronic office promised to reduce paper work and lessen work loads, but it has, in fact, generated more information that must sill be printed and -even more challenging-be assimilated. Since computers entered office systems, paper utilization has increased six-fold.More [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
Few companies that installed computers to reduce the employment of clerks have realized their expectations.... They now need more, and more expensive clerks even though they call them 'operators' or 'programmers'.More [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
Don't explain computers to laymen. Simpler to explain sex to a virgin.More [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
David Lightman: Joshua called me.
McKittrick: [incredulous] David, computers don't call people!
David Lightman: [shrugs] Yours did.More [11/27/2005 12:11:00]
Cereal Killer: FYI man, alright. You could sit at home, and do like absolutely nothing, and your name goes through like 17 computers a day. 1984? Yeah right, man. That's a typo. Orwell is here now. He's livin' large. We have no names, man. No names. We are nameless!More [01/16/2008 12:01:00]
Kate Libby: Why'd he come to you?
Dade Murphy: I got a record! I was 'Zero Cool'!
Paul Cook: Zero Cool? Crashed fifteen hundred and seven computers in one day? Biggest crash in history, front page New York Times August 10th, 1988. I thought you was black man. YO THIS IS ZERO COOL!More [01/16/2008 12:01:00]
Albert Brooks:
Our research was so thorough the computers actually coughed up two perfect families. If I were a liar, I could tell you that we chose one over the other for complicated psychological reasons. But I'm a comedian, not a liar. I can afford the luxury of honesty. The Feltons lived in Wisconsin; the Yeagers lived in Arizona. YOU spend the winter in Wisconsin...


[Albert and the researchers all laugh]

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
Dugan:
[Capt. Dugan, in his last day on the job before retiring, is describing the conditions in the Precinct] Three and four generations of families on welfare. Drug dealers. Winos. Junkies. Pimps! Murderers. Maniacs. Cop-killers...



Connolly:
You finished?



Dugan:
Yeah, I'm finished. I'm goin' to Florida, Connelly. I'm goin' fishin'. So you can bring up all your computers and your slide rules and your psychological techniques. I mean this neighborhood'll bury ya. There's enough dirt in this precinct to bury every smart-ass cop in the city...

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
Dr. Walter Gibbs:
Ha, ha. You've got to expect some static. After all, computers are just machines; they can't think.



Alan Bradley:
Some programs will be thinking soon.



Dr. Walter Gibbs:
Won't that be grand? Computers and the programs will start thinking and the people will stop.

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
Dr. Walter Gibbs:
User requests are what computers are for!



Ed Dillinger:
DOING OUR BUSINESS is what computers are for.

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
McKittrick:
General, the machine has locked us out. It's sending random numbers to the silos.



Pat Healy:
Codes. To launch the missiles.



General Beringer:
Just unplug the goddamn thing! Jesus Christ!



McKittrick:
That won't work, General. It would interpret a shutdown as the destruction of NORAD. The computers in the silos would carry out their last instructions. They'd launch.



General Beringer:
Can't we disarm the missiles?



Pat Healy:
Over a thousand of them? There's no time. At this rate it will hit the launch codes in...5.3 minutes.



General Beringer:
[smiles sarcastically at McKittrick] Mr. McKittrick, after very careful consideration, sir, I've come to the conclusion that your new defense system sucks.



McKittrick:
I don't have to take that, you pig-eyed sack of shit.



General Beringer:
Oh, I was hoping for something a little better than that from you, sir. A man of your education.



Major Lem:
[holding a telephone] General, it's the president.



McKittrick:
What are you...what are you going to tell him?



General Beringer:
I'm ordering our bombers back to fail-safe. We might have to go through this thing after all.

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
Stephen Falken:
The whole point was to find a way to practice nuclear war without destroying ourselves. To get the computers to learn from mistakes we couldn't afford to make. Except, I never could get Joshua to learn the most important lesson.



David Lightman:
What's that?



Stephen Falken:
Futility. That there's a time when you should just give up.



Jennifer:
What kind of a lesson is that?



Stephen Falken:
Did you ever play tic-tac-toe?



Jennifer:
Yeah, of course.



Stephen Falken:
But you don't anymore.



Jennifer:
No.



Stephen Falken:
Why?



Jennifer:
Because it's a boring game. It's always a tie.



Stephen Falken:
Exactly. There's no way to win. The game itself is pointless! But back at the war room, they believe you can win a nuclear war. That there can be "acceptable losses."

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
Homer:
Oh, they have the Internet on computers now.

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
Ardelia Mapp:
Is this Lecter's handwriting? "Clarice, doesn't this random scattering of sites seem desperately random - like the elaborations of a bad liar? Ta, Hannibal Lecter."



Clarice Starling:
"Desperately random." What does he mean?



Ardelia Mapp:
Not random at all, maybe. Like there's some pattern here...?



Clarice Starling:
But there is no pattern or the computers would've nailed it. They're even found in random order.



Ardelia Mapp:
Random because of the one girl. The one he weighted down.



Clarice Starling:
Oh, Fredrica Bimmel, from... Belvedere, Ohio. First girl taken, third body found. Why?



Ardelia Mapp:
'Cause she didn't drift. He weighted her down.



Clarice Starling:
What did Lecter say about...?First principles"?



Ardelia Mapp:
Simplicity...



Clarice Starling:
What does this guy do, he "covets". How do we first start to covet?



Ardelia Mapp:
"We covet what we see -"



Clarice Starling:
" - every day."



Ardelia Mapp:
Hot damn, Clarice.



Clarice Starling:
He knew her.

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
Ami:
Knowledge is something you learn on your own, computers don't make you smart!



Gaboran:
Shut the hell up!

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
Dr. Kristin Westphalen:
We'll need precise specifications of the venting cap assembly.



Capt. Nathan Bridger:
[taps her on the shoulder] I think we need a troubleshooter.



Dr. Kristin Westphalen:
A what?



Capt. Nathan Bridger:
I don't think what's happening on this boat is an accident. I think we need someone to go down into the guts of her computers and look around a bit.

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
Brilliant:
You know Ronnie Corbett? He's brilliant! But he's not really small. They made him look small to fit on telly. They did it with trick photography, which is brilliant. Only they call it special effects, and they're brilliant. Like in Terminator 2. Have you seen it? It's about this bloke who can turn into a puddle and back again. Fantastic! Aren't sequels brilliant? They're the same film but with a different number, like two or three. Even bad films are great, 'cause at least they try. In the future, all films will be brilliant. In fact, everything will be brilliant in the future, with cars on monorails, brilliant silvery costumes, food in pills and probably some special futurey can-opener. Fantastic! And everything will be done by computers. Aren't computers brilliant? They can do anything! Except play football. They'd be no good in goal, but they do everything else, virtually. I'n't virtual reality brilliant? It's exactly like reality, only you wear a hat! I tried it with me brother's crash helmet and I fell down the stairs. Aren't hospitals brilliant?

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
Angela:
They hack into computers and they cause this chaos.

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
Judge Judy:
What do I know about Myspace? It's an Internet site where people, who have nothing better to do with their time, go and chat about a whole bunch of nonsense. We could eliminate a third of the problems in this country, if people actually had to shovel coal into a furnace for heat... rather than spending all that time they have making problems for other people, by sitting at their personal computers doing things other than those which PCs were actually designed for.

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
IBM Executive:
The profits are in the computers themselves, not this software stuff.

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
Bill Gates:
Now, we know that IBM has set up this place to complete head-on with Apple, and that you're gearing up to come out with a personal computer that will wipe them out. So we can get you an operating system.



IBM executive:
What kind of operating system?



Bill Gates:
It's called DOS.



Ballmer (narrating):
This is amazing. Not just amazing, it's historic. It should be taught in all the history books. Hung and framed in the National Gallery or something, because this is the instant of creation of one of the greatest fortunes in the history of the world. I mean, Bill Gates is the richest guy in the world because of what started in this room. And you wanna know what else? It wasn't exactly smoke and mirrors, but we didn't have anything! I mean, not a damn thing! Here we were, this two-bit little outfit, telling IBM we had the answer to their problems. The DOS? The Disk Operating System? To make all those zillion IBM computers compute? We didn't remotely own anything like what Bill was selling them. Nada. Zip.

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
[first lines]



John Connor:
[voiceover] The future has not been written. There is no fate but what we make for ourselves. I wish I could believe that. My name is John Connor, they tried to murder me before I was born, when I was 13 they tried again. Machines from the future. Terminators. All my life my mother told me the storm was coming, Judgment Day, the beginning of the war between man and machines. Three billion lives would vanish in an instant, and I would lead what was left of the human race to ultimate victory. It hasn't happened, no bombs fell, computers didn't take control, we stopped Judgment Day. I should feel safe, but I don't, so I live off the grid - no phone, no address, no one and nothing can find me. I've erased all connections to the past, but as hard as I try I can't erase my dreams, my nightmares.

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
John Connor:
By the time Skynet became self-aware it had spread into millions of computer servers across the planet. Ordinary computers in office buildings, dorm rooms; everywhere. It was software; in cyberspace. There was no system core; it could not be shutdown. The attack began at 6:18 PM, just as he said it would. Judgment Day, the day the human race was almost destroyed by the weapons they'd built to protect themselves. I should have realized it was never our destiny to stop Judgment Day, it was merely to survive it, together. The Terminator knew; he tried to tell us, but I didn't want to hear it. Maybe the future has been written. I don't know; all I know is what the Terminator taught me; never stop fighting. And I never will. The battle has just begun.

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
Palmon:
You just like playing on your computer. That's all.



Izzy:
You think I'm just playing around here?



Palmon:
I think you like computers more than people.

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
The Atom:
They're programming the computers for a chain reaction to blow up the atomic pile.



Beetleman leader:
A tiny Earthling comes to challenge us.



Bettleman soldier:
Stamp him out like an insect.

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
Vernon:
I just wish I had my own tropical island, I wish... I wish I was... I could go to China, I wish I could go out of The States... I wish I had my own planet, I wish I... I wish there were 200 of me, man... I wish I could just sit around with computers and just brainstorm all day man. I wish I was born again... I wish I could get saved and get my life through Christ... then maybe he can forgive me for what I did... I wish there was just one belief... my belief.

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
Bob Page:
In case you were wondering, Helios intercepted your transmission; we accessed the Ocean Lab computers ourselves, which means our UCs will be operational shortly.



JC Denton:
Meanwhile, we will be manufacturing a cure to the virus.



Bob Page:
A cure? A cure! Do you have any idea how easy it will be for me to make a new virus? All I have to do is find a very large prime number and multiply.



JC Denton:
And all we have to do is crack the code.



Bob Page:
Mathematically unlikely. As are your chances of leaving the Ocean Lab, by the way.



JC Denton:
You're next, Page. Your greatest strength was secrecy, but now we know everything, including your present location.



Bob Page:
Always the optimist. You would need an army to attack me at Area 51, and pretty soon - if the missile is accurate - your "X-51" will be a thin, gray smudge where Vandenberg used to be.

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
Matt Farrell:
Jesus Christ. It's a fire sale.



John McClane:
What?



Matt Farrell:
It's a fire sale.



Deputy Director Miguel Bowman:
Hey! We don't know that yet.



Taylor:
And it's a myth anyway. It can't be done.



Matt Farrell:
Oh, it's a myth? Really? Please tell me she's only here for show and she's actually not in charge of anything.



John McClane:
What's a fire sale?



Matt Farrell:
It's a three-step... it's a three-step systematic attack on the entire national infrastructure. Okay, step one: take out all the transportation. Step two: the financial base and telecoms. Step three: You get rid of all the utilities. Gas, water, electric, nuclear. Pretty much anything that's run by computers which... which today is almost everything. So that's why they call it a fire sale, because everything must go.

More [06/16/2016 01:06:42]
I think it's fair to say that personal computers have become the most empowering tool we've ever created. They're tools of communication, they're tools of creativity, and they can be shaped by their user.More [07/03/2011 10:07:58]
Security is, I would say, our top priority because for all the exciting things you will be able to do with computers - organizing your lives, staying in touch with people, being creative - if we don't solve these security problems, then people will hold back.More [07/03/2011 10:07:38]
I happen to think that computers are the most important thing to happen to musicians since the invention of cat-gut which was a long time ago.More [07/27/2011 08:07:04]
I've never had Internet access. Actually, I have looked at things on other people's computers as a bystander. A few times in my life I've opened email accounts, twice actually, but it's something I don't want in my life right now.More [07/29/2011 04:07:20]
There is a computer disease that anybody who works with computers knows about. It's a very serious disease and it interferes completely with the work. The trouble with computers is that you 'play' with them!More [09/02/2011 11:09:54]
You have to wait for people to program you. The only difference is the amount of people that you're going to reach but that's going to even out in the next two or three years anyway. Computers are being bought faster than televisions right now.More [09/14/2011 02:09:58]
I'm projecting somewhere between 100 million and 200 million computers on the Net by the end of December 2000, and about 300 million users by that same time.More [09/28/2011 02:09:48]
After a semester or so, my infatuation with computers burnt out as quickly as it had begun.More [10/05/2011 01:10:54]
I use computers for email, staying current with my own website as well as finding important information through other websites. I also use it for creating MP3 files of new music I'm working on.More [10/16/2011 10:10:58]
I actually use a computer a lot. I have three computers that I use on a regular basis - one is on my desk top in my Washington office, another is at home, and I have my laptop that I use when I'm travelling.More [10/19/2011 04:10:11]
Many computers and smartphones automatically set back their clocks by an hour on Sunday morning, unaware that the country would remain permanently on summertime under orders issued by President Dmitry Medvedev in March.More [12/13/2011 02:12:33]
If you think about some of the things that are being talked about by thoughtful, intelligent scientists, you realize that in 100 years the human race won't even be recognizable. We may indeed be part machine and we may have computers implanted. It's more than theoretically possible to implant a chip in the brain that would contain all the information in all the libraries in the world. As people who have talked about this say, it's just a matter of figuring out the wiring.More [01/24/2012 05:01:06]
Up to now, I've been able to avoid Windows NT because the computers that control the power system are for the most part VAXes. But as more things we use, such as time sheets and discrepancy reports, migrate to the NT network, I'll need to do NT. I don't know what will happen; all I can do is try.More [02/01/2012 04:02:48]
By 2009, computers will disappear. Displays will be written directly onto our retinas by devices in our eyeglasses and contact lenses.More [02/12/2012 03:02:37]
Supercomputers will achieve one human brain capacity by 2010, and personal computers will do so by about 2020.More [02/12/2012 03:02:45]
The future lies in designing and selling computers that people don't realize are computers at all.More [03/03/2012 02:03:20]
This individual is a specialist in computers and in radio communication servicesMore [03/04/2012 01:03:12]
You're talking about a lot of money to put computers and networking [technology] in all the offices of the supervisors [of elections], ... It was like $15 million to $17 million.More [04/08/2012 03:04:36]
So when you do board, the first class people, they're sitting there. A lot of them are working as your boarding. They have computers out and calculators. They're looking up at you like, "Hey, we're making money right now! Right now we're making money.More [07/16/2012 04:07:39]
Items like televisions and computers are considered hazardous waste.More [12/14/2012 05:12:29]
Items like televisions and computers are considered hazardous waste. If we have to dispose of an item like that now, it isn't just a matter of putting it in the trash. It requires special handling.More [12/14/2012 05:12:50]
I have a crazy amount of different jobs, so the way I manage that is to not do more than one at a time. It's like old computers that had small memory chips, they would do something called swapping, where they would fill the memory with one task, do it and get it out.More [09/09/2013 07:09:54]
Anyway, all these computers and digital gadgets are no good. They just fill your head with numbers and that can't be good for you.More [01/01/2000 12:01:00]
The only thing I do on a computer is play Texas Hold 'Em, really. Obviously my cell phone is a computer. My car is a computer. I'm on computers every day without actively seeking them out.More [03/12/2018 02:03:32]
Home computers are being called upon to perform many new functions, including the consumption of homework formerly eaten by the dog.More [03/12/2018 02:03:32]
Think? Why think! We have computers to do that for us.More [03/12/2018 02:03:32]
Computing is not about computers any more. It is about living.More [03/12/2018 02:03:32]
People think computers will keep them from making mistakes. They're wrong. With computers you make mistakes faster.More [03/12/2018 02:03:32]
Access to computers and the Internet has become a basic need for education in our society.More [03/12/2018 02:03:32]
Nanotechnology will let us build computers that are incredibly powerful. We'll have more power in the volume of a sugar cube than exists in the entire world today.More [03/12/2018 02:03:32]

« Page 1 from 17, showing 1 - 60 from 1006 »

Quotes of the month

Aleksandar Cotric If you accept all of our terms, we will agree to a compromise. [12/25/2020 05:12:27] More


Aleġandr Kargin A person is tagged by his actions. [12/25/2020 02:12:46] More


Alexander Balyak The aphorism is a monumental miniature. [12/20/2020 08:12:18] More


Daliborka Sismanovic Kepcija Our thieves are not restricted in movement. With a diplomatic passport, they can go anywhere. [12/25/2020 05:12:33] More


Dmitry Andreev Man should work like a bee, not work like a horse. [01/01/2021 11:01:31] More