Rob Lowe

Rob Lowe

His role in 'St. Elmo's Fire' (1985)

Background:

“There’s a reason why Harrison Ford became a star in his mid-30s, why Kevin
Costner was cut out of The Big Chill and became a movie star later. Men come
into their power as they get older and act from their power. I’m coming into
that time in my life, and I think that is reading onscreen. Rob Lowe

American actor Rob Lowe was one of the nine original members of the 1980s “Brat
Pack,” along side Demi Moore, Judd Nelson, Andrew McCarthy Mare Winningham,
Anthony Michael Hall, Molly Ringwald, Emilio Estevez and Ally Sheedy, and became
recognized after performing in a series of well-liked films that included other
“Brat Packer,” most notably St. Elmo’s Fire (1985, won a Razzie Award). The thin
actor won praise for his roles in Thursday’s Child (1983, TV), Square Dance
(1987), Wayne’s World (1992), the miniseries “Stephen King’s The Stand” (1994),
Atomic Train (1999, TV) and Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (1999). He is
perhaps most famous to TV audiences as Sam Seaborn in the NBC White House drama
“The West Wing” (1999-2003), where he picked up two SAG Awards, as well as
earned an Emmy and two Golden Globes nods.

In addition to a solid career, Lowe achieved notoriety in late 1980s when a
videotape of him having sex with two women (one underage) went public. He was
sentenced to do community service for twenty hours and later obligated to a
rehabilitation clinic for sex and alcohol addiction.

“My grandmother, Peg Helper, had breast cancer and I watched her fight it for
almost 20 years. Through it all, my grandfather was just so supportive, which
inspired, which inspired me. Every man should approach this disease with the
same dignity.” Rob Lowe

Off screen, Rob Lowe, whose grandmother and great-grandmother both suffered from
breast cancer, is a breast cancer advocate. In 2000, he became the first male
spokesperson for Lee National Denim Day charity performance, which donates
millions of dollars for breast cancer research and education.

“Marriage is the best thing that has happened to me. It’s a bit like
parachuting. The jump is terrifying but then it becomes a beautiful,
exhilarating flight. “Rob Lowe on marriage

On more personal note, one of John Willis’ Screen World’s “12 Promising New
Actors” (1994) and one of People Magazine’s “50 most beautiful people in the
World” (2000), Lowe is married to makeup artist Sheryl Berkoff and has two sons
with her. The family currently resides in Montecito, California. Lowe has also
been romantically involved with such celebrity beauties as Melissa Gilbert,
Nastassja Kinski (dated while in the set of the 1984 he Hotel New Hampshire),
Chynna Phillips, as well as Princess Stephanie of Monaco. He also dated New York
socialite Cornelia Guest and woman Fawn Hall.


Most Spirited Student

Childhood and Family:

Robert Hepler Lowe, who would later be famous as Rob Lowe, was born on March 17,
1964, in Charlottesville, Virginia. His father is Chuck Lowe, a trial lawyer,
and his mother is Barbara Lowe, a writer and former school teacher. He is the
older brother of actor Chad Lowe (born in 1968). When he was only a little
child, Rob moved with his family to Dayton, Ohio. Following his parents’
separation, his mother brought Rob and his younger brother Chad to move to Los
Angeles. He attended Santa Monica High School in California, where actors
Charlie Sheen and Sean Penn were among his classmates. He was chosen as the
“Most School Spirited” in high school.

On July 22, 1991, Rob married makeup artist Sheryl Berkoff (born on June, 20
1961). The two met on a blind date in 1983 and rejoined while on the set of the
1990 film Bad Influence. Rob and wife have two sons, Edward Matthew (born on
September 24, 1993) and John Owen (born on November 6, 1995).


West Wing

Career:

While growing up in Dayton, Ohio, the Virginia native Rob Lowe was encouraged to
become a performer after seeing a local production of “Oliver” in 1974. After
moving to Los Angeles, the young Lowe found work in television commercials and
broke into acting as a teenager. He got his first real acting job at age 15 when
he was cast in the plum role of Tony Flanagan, the son of Eileen Brennan in the
short-lived ABC sitcom “A New Kind of Family.” He followed it up with
performances in television movies, including playing the title teen in the ABC
Afterschool Special Schoolboy Father (1980) and as Sam Alden in Thursday’s Child
(1983), where he was nominated for Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting
Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made at Golden Globe Awards,
before hitting the wide screen for the first time as the brother of Patrick
Swayze in Francis Ford Coppola’s The Outsiders (1983).

Lowe then took on the role of an affluent prep-school student whose mom has an
affair with his roommate in Class (1983), was featured opposite Nastassja Kinski
and Jodie Foster in the film version of John Irving’s The Hotel New Hampshire
(1984) and headlined the sport-comedy Oxford Blues (1984) as an American
attending the famed British university. Trading only on his attractiveness, Lowe
choice of roles eventually garnered him bad reviews when he won a Razzie for
Worst Supporting Actor for his portrayal of Billy Hicks in Joel Schumacher’s St.
Elmo’s Fire (1985). Despite the mixed appraisals, Lowe won attention as one of
‘Brat Pack’ members that include twentysomething actors and costars Demi Moore,
Emilio Estevez and Andrew McCarthy. The next years, he rejoined Patrick Swayze
for Youngblood (1986), and in About Last Night... (1986), he was teamed once
again with fellow Brat Pack member Demi Moore.

In 1987, Lowe proved he was more than a pretty face with his Golden
Globe-nominated, scene-stealing performance as mentally-challenged youth Rory in
director Daniel Petrie’s drama Square Dance, starring Jason Robards, Jane
Alexander and Winona Ryder. He branched out to stage acting with a role in
“Three Sisters” at Williamstown Theatre Festival, that same year. Lowe was
well-received as Tim Whalen in the romantic thriller Masquerade (1988), but it
was his off-screen life and his terrible appearance on the 1989 Academy Awards
telecast singing to a fake Snow White with the song “Proud Mary” that got him
more notice.

The actor started to re-establish his acting career by making an amusing guest
appearance in the popular “Saturday Night Live” (1990) and taking the evil role
of Alex, opposite James Spader, in Curtis Hanson’s Bad Influence (1990). He next
found himself staring with fellow ex-‘Brat Packer’ Judd Nelson in the little
seen The Dark Backward (1991) and once again received strong reviews for his
small, but memorable, turn as TV mogul Benjamin Kane in Mike Myers vehicle
Wayne’s World (1992). Still in 1992, Lowe made his Broadway debut in the
National Actors Theatre staging of Feydeau’s “A Little Hotel on the Side,”
playing a virginal philosophy student.

The next years, Lowe offered strong portrayals on the small screen like in PBS
remake of Suddenly Last Summer (1993) against such powerful actors as Natasha
Richardson and Maggie Smith, and in ABC’s miniseries version of “Stephen King’s
The Stand,” in which he earned several of his finest reviews. He was also seen
in silver screen films, including Tommy Boy (1995, starred SNL cast members
David Spade and Chris Farley), For Hire (1997), the box office hit Austin
Powers: International Man of Mystery (1997, made an uncredited cameo as
decapitated henchman’s friend), Living in Peril (1997), Contact (1997, gave a
solid supporting performance as a right-wing Christian leader) and Crazy Six
(1998). Aside from acting, Lowe also temporarily took on behind the scene works
like as a co-producer in Western Frank and Jesse (1994, also costarred with Bill
Paxton) and a director and writer for the short Desert’s Edge (Showtime, 1997).


The 5’ 11” player rounded out the decade with a remarkable comedic turn in
Austin Powers franchise, Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me, in which he
displayed his great impersonation of Robert Wagner by costarring as Young Number
Two, and by having the triumphant starring role as John Seger in the NBC action
TV film Atomic Train. It was also in 1999 that marked Lowe’s auspicious comeback
to series TV with a starring role as Sam Seaborn, the US President’s deputy
communications director, in the NBC ensemble drama “The West Wing.” For his
bright efforts, he earned an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Lead Actor in 2001
and two Golden Globe nods for Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series –
Drama in 2000 and in 2001. With other talented cast mates that include Allison
Janney, Richard Schiff, Stockard Channing, Bradley Whitford, and Martin Sheen,
he also shared two Screen Actors Guild Awards for Outstanding Performance by an
Ensemble in a Drama Series in 2001 and in 2002. Due to different opinions with
the show producers, he departed the series in 2003, with a highly published
exit.

During 2000-2003, Lowe also had roles in such films as Under Pressure (2000),
The Specials (2000), Proximity (2001), Jane Doe (2001, TV), Framed (2002, TV),
Austin Powers in Goldmember (2002), The Christmas Shoes (2002, TV) and A View
From the Top (2003). Following his leaving from “The West Wing,” Lowe had two
short-lived series under his belt: the legal drama, “Lyon’s Den” (2003),
starring as an idealistic lawyer named Jack Turner, and the CBS drama “Dr.
Vegas” (2004-2005), playing a doctor at a Las Vegas casino. In the meantime, he
also devoted his time for several TV movies and appeared in the miniseries
“Beach Girls” (2005). He returned to motion picture with a small part in the
Aaron Eckhart and Maria Bello vehicle Thank You for Smoking (2005), a Jason
Reitman’s satirical comedy. Also in 2005, he resurfaced on stage by starring as
Lieutenant Daniel Kaffee in a London West End production of Aaron Sorkin’s play
“A Few Good Men.”

Recently, Lowe reprised the Sam Seaborn role for two final episodes of “The West
Wing.” He is schedule to star in writer-director Ernie Barbarash’s
horror/thriller Stir of Echoes: The Dead Speak, which is for 2007 release. The
Vancouver-based mega-indie Lions Gate Films-produced film is an installment of
the 1999 Kevin Bacon supernatural thriller Stir Of Echoes. It follows the story
of a soldier (Lowe) who comes home from a tour of duty in Iraq but is haunted by
visions of the dead.


Awards:

Screen Actors Guild: Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama
Series, The West Wing, 2002
Screen Actors Guild: Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama
Series, The West Wing, 2001
Razzie: Worst Supporting Actor, ST. Elmo’s Fire, 1986
I have never felt at any point in my life, good or bad, any ill will ever from the man or woman on the street.More Rob Lowe quotes [03/29/2018 05:03:36]
Show me someone who doesn't have some sort of experience that they would be uncomfortable for people to know about and I'll show you a dullard.More Rob Lowe quotes [08/03/2011 05:08:29]
I'll be sober ten years and married nine soon.More Rob Lowe quotes [08/03/2011 05:08:14]
I have, on the other hand, felt ill will from various people in the industry and the press.More Rob Lowe quotes [08/03/2011 05:08:49]
When I hear that I realize how quickly time passes and how everybody goes on their journeys and they're always unbelievable and they never go where you think they're going to take you and, quite frankly, it also makes me feel a little old.More Rob Lowe quotes [03/29/2018 05:03:36]

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