Steven Soderbergh

Steven Soderbergh

Oscar win for Traffic (2000)

Background:

“I learned from Richard Lester that as your career goes on, you learn more about
how things can go wrong, but you never learn how things can go right, and it’s
really disorienting.” Steven Soderbergh

Steven Soderbergh solidified his reputation as a phenomenal moviemaker with his
two notable Traffic (2000) and Erin Brockovich (2000). Traffic (2000) won 14
Best Director awards (including an Oscar) and Erin Brockovich (2000) collected 7
Best Director awards and an Oscar nomination.

Debuting with the Grammy-nominated concert video 9012LIVE (1986), Soderbergh
attracted attention with his award-winning Sex, Lies, and Videotape (1989). For
his work in the film, he took home an Independent Spirit Award, two Cannes Film
Festival prizes and a Sundance Film Festival Audience Award, as well as an Oscar
nomination. He was later praised for his action film Out of Sight (1998, won a
National Society of Film Critics Award).

In March 2002, Soderbergh, who ranked No.35 in Premiere’s 2002 “Power 100” list,
was elected Vice President of the Directors Guild of America. Recently,
Soderbergh and George Clooney shut down Section Eight, a production company they
formed six years ago.

On a more private note, the ex-husband of Betsy Brantley (divorced in 1994,
share a daughter) is currently in a relationship with Jules Asner. They began
seeing each other in 2001.


Arcade Employee

Childhood and Family:

Born on January 14, 1963, in Atlanta, Georgia, Steven Soderbergh is the son of a
dean from the Louisiana State University’s College of Education. After moving to
Texas, Pennsylvania, and Charlottesville, the family finally settled in Baton
Rouge, Louisiana.

Developing an interest in moviemaking, teenaged Steven enrolled in the
university’s film animation class while he was in high school. After graduation,
he briefly became a freelance editor in L.A. before working as a coin-changer in
a Baton Rouge video arcade. Later, Steven used his father’s first and middle
name, Peter Andrew, to bill himself as a cinematographer. He also used the
pseudonym Mary Ann Bernard as a movie editor.

Swedish-descent Steven was married to actress Betsy Brantley, but they were
divorced in 1994. The couple shares a daughter named Sarah, who was born in
1990.


Erin Brockovich

Career:

When he was 15, Steven Soderbergh made a short film titled Janitor (1978). He
then edited the short-lived TV show “Games People Play” (1980) after previously
being employed as a cue-card holder and game-show scorekeeper.

Returning to Baton Rouge, Soderbergh made his professional directing debut with
the promotional concert video 9012LIVE (1986), for the rock band Yes. The video
premiered on MTV and later earned a Grammy nomination for Best Music Video, Long
Form. He also created some Super-8 short films, including a film about sexual
deception titled Winston (1987, cost about $7,500).

As an extension of Winston, Soderbergh directed, wrote and edited the
feature-length drama Sex, Lies, and Videotape (1989). Before long, the
ground-breaking project won an Independent Spirit award for Best Director, two
Cannes Film Festival prizes and a Sundance Film Festival Audience award, as well
as an Oscar nomination for Best Original Screenplay. He then directed the
thriller Kafka (1991) and King of the Hill (1993, received a Cannes Film
Festival nomination), which was based on A.E. Hotchner’s novel. Also in 1993, he
directed an episode of the series “Fallen Angels” and began producing the
thriller Suture.

Two years later, Soderbergh helmed another episode of “Fallen Angels” (1995) and
revived Don Tracy’s novel in the crime drama Underneath (1995). Detouring to the
comedy genre, he shot Gray’s Anatomy (1996) and Schizopolis (1996, also served
as a cinematographer and actor, playing dual roles). A year later, he directed
Ewan McGregor and Nick Nolte in the horror thriller Nightwatch (1997).

The producer of Pleasantville (1998, earned a Golden Satellite nomination) took
home a National Society of Film Critics award for Best Director after helming
the action film Out of Sight (1998, starring George Clooney). Following the
acclaimed crime thriller The Limey (1999), Soderbergh collected critical
appreciation for his directing effort in the based-on-fact drama Erin Brockovich
(2000). The applauded director was handed numerous Best Director awards for his
efforts and an Oscar and Golden Globe nomination.

Reaching the pinnacle of his career, Soderbergh revived the British miniseries
“Traffik” in the big screen version Traffic (2000, also served as director of
photography) and swept up an Oscar, a Golden Satellite, a National Board of
Review and nine other awards for Best Director. Additionally, he also won a
Kinema Junpo for Best Foreign Language Film and received a Directors Guild of
America and Golden Globe nomination. He then re-teamed with George Clooney in
the blockbuster remake Ocean’s Eleven (2001, also had unaccredited appearance as
vault-bombing thief), tried the romantic comedy genre with Full Frontal (2002)
and scored success with the self-penned sci-fi Solaris (2002).

Still with Clooney, Soderbergh made the satirical series “K Street” (2003) and
the underrated sequel Ocean’s Twelve (2004). He also helmed a segment of the
drama collage Eros (2004), wrote the script of Criminal (2004, credited as Sam
Lowry), helmed the crime drama Bubble (2005) and directed the pilot episode of
the series “Unscripted” (2005).

The high-profile director will soon turn up with the post-war Berlin set drama
The Good German (2006). Soderbergh’s next projects, Guerilla, and Ocean’s
Thirteen are scheduled for a 2007 release. He is also set to direct the
documentary film about comedian Spalding Gray titled Life Interrupted (2007).


Awards:

Kinema Junpo: Best Foreign Language Film, Traffic, 2002
Oscar: Best Director, Traffic, 2001
Golden Satellite: Best Director, Traffic, 2001
Broadcast Film Critics Association: Best Director, Traffic, 2001
Chicago Film Critics Association: Best Director, Traffic, 2001
Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association: Best Director, Traffic, 2001
Kansas City Film Critics Circle: Best Director, Traffic, 2001
Southeastern Film Critics Association: Best Director, Traffic, 2001
Vancouver Film Critics Circle: Best Director, Traffic, 2001
Florida Film Critics Circle: Best Director, Erin Brockovich, 2001
Broadcast Film Critics Association: Best Director, Erin Brockovich, 2001
National Society of Film Critics: Best Director, Erin Brockovich, 2001
National Society of Film Critics: Best Director, Traffic, 2001
Las Vegas Film Critics Society: Sierra Award - Best Director, Erin
Brockovich, 2000
Las Vegas Film Critics Society: Sierra Award - Best Director, Traffic,
2000
Los Angeles Film Critics Association: Best Director, Erin Brockovich,
2000
Los Angeles Film Critics Association: Best Director, Traffic, 2000
National Board of Review: Best Director, Erin Brockovich, 2000
National Board of Review: Best Director, Traffic, 2000
New York Film Critics Circle: Best Director, Erin Brockovich, 2000
New York Film Critics Circle: Best Director, Traffic, 2000
Toronto Film Critics Association: Best Director, Traffic, 2000
National Society of Film Critics: Best Director, Out of Sight, 1999
Independent Spirit: Best Director, Sex, Lies, and Videotape, 1990
Cannes Film Festival: FIPRESCI Prize, Sex, Lies, and Videotape, 1989
Cannes Film Festival: Golden Palm, Sex, Lies, and Videotape, 1989
Sundance Film Festival: Audience Award – Dramatic, Sex, Lies, and
Videotape, 1989
 
A big part of making an album is that you want to have enough material - you want to have enough stuff for people to hear and know that it represents you. So it does sometimes turn into a situation where you're saying to the person you're working with, "Well, what do you want?" But then there are other times when I work with people and they'll turn to me and say, "How do you want to do this?" And that's actually when I work best.More Steven Soderbergh quotes [03/29/2018 05:03:36]
My working life is me doing what I want to do. This is that. I've made movies that people don't go to see.More Steven Soderbergh quotes [03/29/2018 05:03:36]
I just find it annoying that in these sequences [ of the fight scenes], traditionally, there's music trying to pump you up. I don't like that, personally, as an audience member. This just reflects my taste.More Steven Soderbergh quotes [03/29/2018 05:03:36]
Anytime you've got something that can take you into the political realm then you've opened up the conversation a lot.More Steven Soderbergh quotes [03/29/2018 05:03:36]
If you're not flying people around on wires, and you're only allowing them to do things that people can really do, it can't go on for very long, because eventually somebody gets the drop on the other person and then it's over.More Steven Soderbergh quotes [03/29/2018 05:03:36]

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